Can you say Kokedama?

I tried something new last Friday. I met with some friends at the flower heaven Ikebanart in Paris 10th arrondissement where we had booked a Kokedama workshop with Gwenaël, our teacher for the night!

A Kokedama is a Japanese floral art. It is composed of a ball of soil, covered with moss, on which an ornamental plant grows. According to Wikipedia, it “is also called poor man’s bonsai”.

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First step is selecting your plant! I set my mind on a delicate Monstera Deliciosa. According to Gwenaël, that plant can really grow, at some point its roots can even outgrow the ball. I don’t mind the challenge… if I can keep it alive long enough to see this!

Second step is forming the soil ball with a mix of different soils and a lot of water. Then, you delicately separate the ball in two and place your plant’s roots within before “closing” the ball around it.

Last step is wrapping it in moss and fixing the whole thing with nylon. That last part demands a little bit of skill. I kept getting mixed up in my nylon threads, but at some point… Voilà ! My Kokedama was standing!

 

The process may sound simple, I am sparing you a lot of tiny details, but in reality some parts can be tricky unless you are used to making Kokedamas. Luckily we had a great teacher to help us and guide us!

Even if I like having some plants and flowers around, taking care of them is not my favorite activity. I usually much prefer those I don’t need to take care of., so taking a class to create something like that kokedama was a first for me. It was more some friend’s idea than mine. At first I just tagged along, figuring “why not, let’s try something new”. But now that I did, I can say I really loved it, I feel really proud of what I made. It was a fun discovery that I recommend!

It always feels good to make something with your own hands as well as to reconnect with the nature around us. What better idea than to do both at the same time? 😉

 

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